News
Tuesday, December 04, 2018
Author: John Patterson

Tracking Study on the Evolution of Legal Cannabis in Canada

Advanis Research and Patterson, Langlois Consultants have completed the first wave of tracking research on the evolution of the legal Cannabis market in Canada.    This study looks at the le...

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Tracking Study on the Evolution of Legal Cannabis in Canada

Advanis Research and Patterson, Langlois Consultants have completed the first wave of tracking research on the evolution of the legal Cannabis market in Canada.    This study looks at the legalization of cannabis in Canada with consideration for the concerns of all stakeholders, be they public, commercial or regulatory. Our study is built on the premise that good data that builds consensus on critical dimensions is key to ensuring an appropriate outcome.  

Key Questions and Issues addressed in this study: 

  • How well and how quickly is the legal market
    supplanting black-market supply?
  • How are consumers reacting to the legal system?
  • What evidence is there of conversion from black-market
    channels and of new entrants?
  • Which of the different supply models are doing the
    best job?
  • Which of the different supply models are doing the best job?
  • What is the shape of consumption?
  • Who is consuming and why?
  • How is cannabis consumption affecting consumption of other substances, notably nicotine and alcohol?
  • How many have prescriptions and how will the medical industry cope as recreational product becomes more accessible?
  • What kinds of problems, ailments or conditions are we consuming cannabis for?
  • How might regulations have to evolve?
  • What evidence is there of harm and risks that can be attributed to legalization?
  • Is understanding of the risks and benefits of cannabis improving?
  • What impact is cannabis having on consumers’ lives and on the population that does not consume?
  • How do the impacts and adverse outcomes of cannabis use compare to those of other substances such as alcohol or tobacco?
  • Who appear to be “at risk,” and what risks are recognizable?

For public-available data or for a prospectus, please contact us.